Author: Sustainable Review

  1. Business
  2. Lifestyle
  3. People
  4. Profit
  5. Thinking

Hot take music festivals need sustainability now more than ever.

What’s the matter The music industry is an integral part of society, but it has some catching up to do in the world of sustainability. With constant traveling, waste production and energy demands, tours and festivals carry a heavy environmental impact.

By the numbers

  • A UK study found that in 2015, five artists collectively generated 19,314 kilograms of CO2 emissions between April and September (the equivalent of 1 million people’s CO2 emission per year)
  • Tours can go through 18,720 plastic bottles a year

Bottom line While touring and festivals may be environmentally harmful now, there are many potential solutions for eliminating single-use plastics, utilizing biodiesel in transportation, recycling batteries, sourcing merchandise made from organic materials, promoting carpooling to the event, and educating fans.

Dig deeper → 2 min

  1. Cities and Communities
  2. Federal
  3. People
  4. Politics and Policy

The global spread of the coronavirus has caused layoff after layoff in the United States, forcing over 40 million Americans to file for unemployment in less than three months. How can America put its citizens back to work while fighting climate change?

What to know

  • FDR kickstarted the economy in the Great Depression by creating the Civilian Conservation Corps to restore America’s infrastructure while employing jobless workers – similar programs could help unemployed workers during COVID-19
  • Other countries are already doing it – Pakistan has employed 63,000 people in its 10 Billion Tree Tsunami Programme
  • Governments control more than 70% of energy investments globally, so they can steer recovery in a positive direction for the climate and their people
  • With an additional $15 trillion in a global COVID-19 recovery plan, we can increase our global GDP by 2.4% and add tens of millions of jobs in energy and infrastructure

Bottom line

  • Implementing a green stimulus is necessary to effectively combat climate change as we emerge from the grips of COVID-19
  • Many communities disproportionately affected by the coronavirus are also disproportionately affected by climate change, so we must target a dualistic recovery

→ Dig deeper 5 min

  1. Lifestyle
  2. People
  3. Thinking

What’s the sitch? For all the innovations we have today, access to quality food is still a critical issue across the globe. Food disparity is driven by a number of factors, such as income inequality and local production levels.

Big picture The barriers that prevent many people from eating healthier are interconnected with race, inequality, and systemic biases embedded in our society. Race, education, careers, income, and housing all play a role in determining food access.

Why it matters Overcoming system inefficiencies like excessive subsidies for meat production helps to lower barriers to healthier foods but it will take a national and global effort to completely eradicate systemic inequalities.

Dig deeper → 1 min

  1. Doing
  2. Lifestyle
  3. People

If you’re a socially conscious adult, you may have experienced trouble navigating the jungle of brands and product offerings that is the eco-friendly space. 

Big picture: Shopping dominates modern culture, yet it also advances many issues like messy supply chains or the abundance of plastic waste in the ocean.

Between the lines: Buying green or purchasing eco-friendly products creates a ‘warm glow’ in consumers. It generates satisfaction, like the feeling from helping others. 

Purse vs. Purpose

  • Buying less is better for the pocket book, but buying green isn’t often more expensive. 
  • Price often largest barrier for consumers
  • Eco friendly items are often more expensive to less sustainable alternatives 

For the people: Buy green or Buy less? Short answer — do both 

  • Limiting your consumption within reason
    • On one : you don’t need to stop buying things you need on a regular basis, but you might not need that fourth pair of sunglasses
    • On the other : you might deserve that new pair of sunglasses after your latest accomplishment, we get it. We encourage you to find a company that has limited environmental impact - Read how here.

Dig deeper → 3 min

  1. Earth Week
  2. Energy and Environment
  3. Planet

“It is worse, much worse, than you think.” Welcome to Earth Day, 2020 edition. For future Friday, we are exploring the 2020s and beyond as it relates to the environmental movement.

Are we talking about coronavirus? No, we’re talking about climate change.

That quote comes from David Wallace-Wells, the author of The Uninhabitable Earth

Emissions today and tomorrow

As of April 22nd, carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations stood at 415.60 parts per million. Given the tight correlation between atmospheric carbon concentrations and global temperatures, we can effectively use that magical number as a proxy for anthropogenic climate change.

Since the Industrial Revolution, CO2 concentrations have continued to rise, prompting notable climate change. But most of that increase has occurred over the last half century. We caused this problem in a matter of only a few decades, so why couldn’t we fix it in that time too? 

In 2018, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report indicating we only had 12 years to keep global temperature rise from surpassing the 1.5 degrees Celsius goal set out in the Paris Agreement. … Read the rest

  1. Earth Week
  2. Energy and Environment
  3. Planet
Read the rest
  1. Earth Week
  2. Energy and Environment
  3. Planet
Read the rest
  1. Earth Week
  2. Energy and Environment
  3. Planet
Welcome to Earth Day, 1990s edition. The U.S. population was 250 million. The Berlin Wall was collapsing. Fresh Prince, Home Improvement and Friends filled our TV screens. Gameboys were the ‘next big thing’. Yes, frosted tips, flat tops and boy bands everywhere. These are the biggest events of the environmental movement of the 1990's that dominated the decade.
  1. Earth Week
  2. Energy and Environment
  3. Planet
  4. Politics and Policy
This is the 1970s: Watergate, Star Wars, heavyweight boxing, leisure suits, big hair, rock and roll. Add environmentalism to the list. Richard Nixon is most well known for the Watergate scandal, but he was also one of America’s most environmentally influential presidents, and some of his accomplishments are noted below. The first half of the 1970s was marked by governmental actions that had significant impacts both in America and abroad. The second half of the decade included a series of environmental disasters that raised widespread consciousness into the importance of protecting our planet.
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